Abbey

The Carroll family of Oriel is a Gaelic family descended from Donough O’Carroll, King of Oriel, and claims a connected genealogy that traces back to Adam.

 

This is a unique privilege and is possible only because of the committing of oral Bardic tradition to manuscript in the various Annals published in medieval times, perhaps the most famous being the Annals of the Four Masters. Genealogy played an important part in Irish Gaelic life as the succession of Chieftainship depended on connected ancestry. The Gaelic nobility is a closed aristocracy. The only means of entry is by birth. This is in contrast to the practices in most of Europe where monarchs can grant nobility to commoners. In Ireland this custom never pertained. The O’Carroll’s of Oriel are descended from Hermeon, the younger son of Milesius, and more laterally from Colla Da Chrioch, one of the three brothers of royal lineage from the 3rd Century A.D. The descent from Adam is as follows:

 

2. Seth.

3. Enos.

4. Cainan.

5. Mahalaleel.

6. Jared.

7. Enoch.

8. Meghuselah.

9. Framech.

10. Noah.

11. Japhet ‘Eldest son of Noah’.

12. Magog.

13. Baoth.

 

14. Phoeniusa Farsaidh, King of Scythia and founder of a school in the Valley of Senaar, near the city of Aeothena. He had two sons, Nenuall who became King of Scythia and Niul, who was let in charge of the school.

 

15. Niul. Niul was invited to Egypt by Pharaoh on account of his learning and given the lands of Campus Cyrunt to rule. This land adjoins the Red Sea. Pharaoh also gave his daughter Scota in marriage to Niul.

 

16. Gaodhal. Gaodhal was the son of Niul. He was a contemporary of Moses who, tradition says, miraculously cured him of snake-bite and who prophesised that his descendants would eventually inhabit a land free of snakes.

 

17. Asruth.

 

18. Sruth. Expelled by Pharaoh from Egypt because his father, Asruth, assisted the Israelites in their escape from Egypt, went to the Island of Creta.

 

19. Heber Scut. Left Creta after one year and returned to Scythia.

20. Beouman, King of Scythia.

21. Ogaman, King of Scythia.

22. Tait, King of Scythia.

23. Agnon.

 

24. Lamhfionn. Eventually settled in Lybia near where the city of Carthage was later built. It was described as the Land of Getulia.

 

25. Heber Glunfionn, King of Getulia.

26. Agnan Fionn, King of Getulia.

27. Febric Glas, King of Getulia.

28. Nenuall, King of Getulia.

29. Nuadhad, King of Getulia.

30. Alladh, King of Getulia.

31. Arcadh, King of Getulia.

32. Deag, King of Getulia.

 

33. Brath of Galicia. Departed with his people from Getulia and went to Galacia in North West Spain.

 

34. Breoghan, King of Galicia. Expanded his kingdom into Portugal. The city of Bragenza in Portugal is called after him.

 

35. Bile, King of Galicia.

 

36. Milesius, married to Scota, daughter of Pharaoh. Travelled extensively in his youth. He went to Scythia and then Egypt where the Pharaoh Nectonibus gave him his daughter Scota in marriage. He returned to Galacia where there was an extensive drought and famine. He sent his Uncle Ithe with one hundred and fifty warriors to Ireland to explore it to see if it would be suitable for colonisation. In an engagement with the inhabitants of Ireland, the Tuatha-de-Danans, Ithe died and a subsequent expedition set out to colonise Ireland led by the eight sons of Milesius. Milesius died before he could join the expedition. It is worth noting that Milesius had three Lions on his shield indicating the tremendous antiquity of Gaelic heraldry. The Carroll family of Oriel and others who claim an unbroken line of descent from the Milesian nobility have Lions on their heraldic coats of arms. These coats of arms can be inspected in the National Library of Ireland, Chief Heralds Office.

 

37. Heremon, seventh son of Milesius and third who left issue started to reign in 1698 B.C. He was the youngest of the three surviving sons of Milesius, the others died in battle against the Tuatha-de-Danan. He died in 1683 B.C.

 

38. Irial Faidh. 10th King of Ireland. He cleared forests and promoted agriculture. He died in 1670 B.C. and is buried at Magh Muagh.

 

39. Eithrial. 11th King of Ireland. Promoted learning and agriculture. Died at the Battle of Sorrean in Leinster in 1650 B.C.

 

40. Foll-aich.

41. Tigernmas. 13th King of Ireland. Died 1543 B.C.

42. Enboath.

43. Smiomghall.

 

44. Fiacha Labhrainn. 18th King of Ireland. Extended his Kingdom to Scotland. Died in 1448 B.C. at the Battle of Bealgadain.

 

45. Aongus Olmucach. 20th King of Ireland. Died in 1409 B.C. at the Battle of Carman.

46. Main.

47. Rotheachtach. 22nd King of Ireland. Died 1357 B.C.

48. Dein.

49. Saoghalach. 34th King of Ireland. Died 1030 B.C.

50. Olioll Aolcheoin.

51. Gialchadh. 37th King of Ireland. Died 1013 B.C.

52. Nuadhas Fionnfail. 39th King of Ireland. Died 961 B.C.

53. Aedan Glas.

54. Simeon Breac. 44th King of Ireland. Died 903 B.C.

55. Muredach Bolgach. 46th King of Ireland. Died 892 B.C.

56. Fiacha Tolgrach. 55th King of Ireland. Died 795 B.C.

57. Duach Ladhrach. 59th King of Ireland. Died 737 B.C.

58. Eochaidh Buadhach.

59. Ugaine Mor. 66th King of Ireland. Married to Caesair, daughter of the King of France. Died in 593 B.C.

60. Colethach Caol-bhreagh. 69th King of Ireland. Died 541 B.C.

61. Melg Molbhthach. 71st King of Ireland. Died 541 B.C.

62. Iaran Gleofathach. 74th King of Ireland. Died 473 B.C.

63. Conla Caomh. 75th King of Ireland. Died 442 B.C.

64. Olioll Cas-Fiachlach. 77th King of Ireland. Died 417 B.C.

65. Eochaidh Alt-Leathan. 79th King of Ireland. Died 395 B.C.

66. Aongus Tuirmeach-Teamrach. 81st King of Ireland. Died 324 B.C.

67. Enna Aigneach. 84th King of Ireland. Died 292 B.C.

68. Assaman Eamhna.

69. Roighen Ruadh.

70. Fionnlogh.

71. Fionn.

72. Eochaidh Feidlioch. 93rd King of Ireland. Died 130 B.C.

73. Bress-Nar-Lothar.

 

74. Lughaidh Sriabh-n Dearg. 98th King of Ireland. Married to Dearbohgaill, daughter of the King of Denmark. Died 8 B.C.

 

75. Crimthann-Niadh-Nar. 100th King of Ireland. Married to Nar-tath-chaoch, daughter of Laoch, granddaughter of Daire of the Picts. Died 9 A.D.

 

76. Feredach Fionn-Feachtnach. 102nd King of Ireland. Died 36 A.D. at Tara.

 

77. Fiacha Fionn Ola. 104th King of Ireland. Married to Eithne, daughter of the King of Scotland. Died 56 A.D.

 

78. Tuathal Teachtmar. 106th King of Ireland. Born to Eithne after the death of his father. Raised by the King of Scotland who helped him recover his kingdom. He unsuccessfully applied to Agricola, the Roman General in Britain for aid in recovering his kingdom. Died 106 A.D.

 

79. Fedhlimidh Rachtmar. 108th King of Ireland. Married to Ughna, daughter of the King of Denmark. Developed the Brehan Legal System. Died 199 A.D.

 

80. Conn Ceadcathach. 109th King of Ireland. Also known as Conn of the hundred battles. Reigned for 35 years. Died at Tara in 157 A.D.

 

81. Art Eanfhear. 112nd King of Ireland.

82. Cormac MacArt.

83. Cairbre Lifeachar.

84. Eochaidh Dubhlen.

85. Colla da Chrioch, died 330 A.D.

86. Rochadh.

87. Deach Dorn.

88. Fiach.

89. Criomhthan Liath.

90. Eochaidh.

91. Caipre Damargait, died 513 A.D.

92. Nadsluaig.

93. Fergus.

94. Ronan.

95. Maeldub.

96. Maelfogartaig, died 697 A.D.

97. Aithecda.

98. Artri, King of Ui Cremthainn, died 742 A.D.

99. Maelfothartaig, died 791 A.D.

100. Ruaidri, King of Ui Cremthainn, died 833 A.D.

101. Fogartach, died 850 A.D.

102. Maelpoil.

103. Cerbhall, died 940 A.D.

104. Laidgnen, King of Fermnag, died 998 A.D.

105. Mathgamain, died 1022 A.D.

106. Cearbhaill.

107. Cu Caisil O’Carroll, King of Farney, died 1123 A.D.

 

108. Donough O’Carroll, King of Oriel, died 1168 A.D. Married to Ann Dunleavy, Queen of Oriel and sister of King Eochaid Dunleavy.

 

109. Murrough O’Carroll, King of Oriel, died 1189 A.D.

110. Mahon O’Carroll, King of Oriel. Died 1193 A.D.

111. Magnus O’Carroll, Lord of Oriel.

112. Hugh O’Carroll, Lord of Oriel.

113. Mahon O’Carroll, Lord of Oriel.

114. Walter O’Carroll, Lord of Clan Carroll, died 1330 A.D.

115. Magnus O’Carroll of Clan Carroll.

116. Donough O’Carroll of Clan Carroll.

117. O’Carroll of Clan Carroll.

118. O’Carroll of Clan Carroll.

119. O’Carroll of Clan Carroll.

120. O’Carroll of Clan Carroll.

121. Donough O’Carroll of Feraghy, died 1560 A.D.

122. O’Carroll of Feraghy.

123. Patrick Carroll of Culcredan. Born 1600, died 1660.

124. James Carroll of Culcredan. Born 1630, died 1700 A.D.

125. Henry Carroll of Killencool Castle, died 1730 A.D.

126. Richard Carroll of Dunbyn. Born 1702, died 1770 A.D.

127. Richard Carroll of Dunbyn. Born 1740, died 1810 A.D. Married to Margaret Smith of Co. Louth.

128. Bernard Carroll. Born 1772, died 1838 A.D. Married to Rose Cassidy of Co. Louth.

129. Bernard Carroll. Born 1806, died 1844 A.D. Married to Catherine McCabe of Co. Louth.

130. Richard Carroll. Born 1836, died 1888 A.D. Married to Margaret Smith of Co. Louth.

131. James Carroll. Born 1884, died 1964 A.D. Married to Mary Kelly of Co. Louth.

 

132. Richard Carroll. Born 1916, died 1997 A.D. Married to Margaret Harvey of Co. Armagh, daughter of Patrick Harvey of Drumuckavall. The Harvey family of Drumuckavall are documented as having been resident there since the seventeenth century.

 

133. Vincent Carroll. Born 1955. Married to Margaret Stafford of Co. Wexford, daughter of George Stafford of Clonjordan and of Catherine Herron. The Herron family are originally from Northumberland. Cecily More, daughter of Sir Thomas More, Lord Chancellor to King Henry VIII married Giles Herron in 1526. His son, Sir Nicholas Herron was granted land in Co. Wexford in 1563.

 

134. Henry, Herron, Stafford, Carroll. Born 2000 A.D.